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Zoe Leonard exhibits at Whitney Museum with Survey.


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Zoe Leonard exhibits at Whitney Museum with Survey.


 

 

ZOE LEONARD
*Survey*


written Nikkolos Mohammed

march 018

Zoe Leonard: Survey is a reflection of her body of work, which focuses on travel, editioning, excess and repetition within daily life; questioning identity within the landscape. Zoe's artistic practice demands you to pay attention to the mundane through a medium of observation - photography. Her poetic eye of universality with artwork reveals an idea of migration and documentation of presence.

 
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 While our current political climate spotlights topics such as DACA (Deferred Action of Childhood Arrivals) and its expiration date, Survey is a very timely show. Currently, there is plenty of conversation which questions whether migrants are good or bad. With the celebration of America and the origins of its' homeland, one might question who is truly a tourist? Zoe Leonard’s body of work in Survey goes back as far as 30 years and questions presence and contribution in the now; present-day. Another language in her work is the idea of sharing. Ephemera of postcards, photography, luggage and store-fronts are all information to be shared as a reflection of contributing to existence within a place and a certain time. Our knit identity is a collection of experiences and more deeply, our experience in different places; an idea conceived in Zoe Leonard’s practice.

Survey opened at the Whitney Museum in New York on March 2nd, 018 and is organized by the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, where it will make its' West Coast debut following the Whitney’s presentation. The exhibition is the first to assess the extraordinary range of the artist’s achievements over more than three decades of her career to date. 

 

WHITNEY MUSEUM, NEW YORK
ZOE LEONARD: SURVEY
MAR 02 –JUNE 10, 018

credits_ 

Zoe Leonard
detail of You see I am here after all, 2008.
 
p3,851 vintagepostcards, 11 × 10 1/2 × 147 ft. (3.35 × 3.2 × 44.8 m) overall.
Installation view, Dia: Beacon, Beacon, New York, 2008.
Collection of the artist; courtesy Galerie Gisela Capitain, Cologne.
Photograph by Bill Jacobson, New York

 

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COS collaborates with artist Phillip K. Smith III for Salone del Mobile 018.


COS collaborates with artist Phillip K. Smith III for Salone del Mobile 018.


 

 

COS x Phillip K. Smith III
*Salone del Mobile 018*


march 018

For this year’s edition of Milan Design Week, London-based fashion brand COS will present a large-scale sculptural installation by American artist Phillip K. Smith III, marking COS’s seventh consecutive installation during Salone del Mobile and its first collaboration with Smith.  Since 2012, COS has presented unique and innovative collaborations with artists, designers, and architects in Milan during Salone del Mobile. Past collaborators include Gary Card, Bonsoir Paris, Nendo, Snarkitecture, and Sou Fujimoto, in addition to Studio Swine, whose installation with COS, New Spring, won the Milano Design Award for Most Engaging Exhibition during Milan Design Week last year. 

 
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 Inspired by Italian Renaissance architecture, the Milanese sky and the understated simplicity of the COS design aesthetic, Phillip K. Smith III will create a site-specific outdoor architectural sculpture in the 16th century courtyard and garden of Palazzo Isimbardi, designed to offer an individual experience to each visitor, through its interaction with light and time.  

At COS, we have been inspired by the way Phillip K. Smith III’s installations interact with their natural surroundings allowing us to experience spaces in new ways, whether in deserts or on beaches, and are eager to see how his work responds to the environment of Milan. It is from these experiences of art, which reshape the way we see the world around us, that we derive so much of our inspiration at COS,” said Karin Gustafsson, Creative Director of COS. 

Phillip K. Smith III noted of the installation, “My work is created in direct response to the surrounding environment, becoming a canvas that interacts with both the urban and natural landscape. I’m thrilled to partner with COS to create this unique sculptural experience which will reframe the historic space. Characterised by ever-changing spatial and temporal elements, every visitor’s experience of the installation will be entirely individual.”  

Palm Springs-based artist Phillip K. Smith III is known for his immersive, light-based installations that employ light, space, colour, the environment and change in order to inspire viewers to reconsider their surroundings. Smith’s works is intensely physical, seemingly ephemeral and highly meditative creating unique spatiotemporal experiences via shifting light, the changing colours of the environment and the movement of the viewer.
Through the atmosphere and pacing of his installations, Smith challenges viewers to slow down and align themselves with the work in order to see and hear the beauty that is in front of them. Phillip K. Smith III received his Bachelor of Fine Arts and Bachelor of Architecture at the Rhode Island School of Design, completing a European Honours Programme at the school in Rome, where the density and complexity of the city’s visual character informed his work around human connectivity, place and perception. 

 

 

NICK MAUSS - TRANSMISSIONS Exhibition at Whitney Museum, New York in 2018.


NICK MAUSS - TRANSMISSIONS Exhibition at Whitney Museum, New York in 2018.


 

 

Nick Mauss
*Transmissions*


february 018

For his exhibition at Whitney, NYC, artist Nick Mauss explores the history of American modernist ballet, continuing a hybrid mode of working he has pursued for a decade in which the roles of curator, artist, choreographer, scholar, and performer converge. New works by Mauss—ranging from scores for a ballet to scenic design, décor elements, and live performance—will appear alongside pieces from the Whitney’s collection and those of other institutions, including the Kinsey Institute for Sex, Gender, and Reproduction and the Jerome Robbins Dance Division of the New York Public Library. Central to the exhibition is a ballet conceived by Mauss in close collaboration with dancers, in response to archival material and the constellation of objects in the show.

 
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 In the current vogue for contemporary dance in museums, the legacy of ballet remains relatively unexamined. This exhibition will consider the intersections of ballet with the visual arts, theater, fashion, and new representations of the body. Focusing on New York’s role in a transatlantic exchange of ballet and surrealist aesthetics, the show presents a vision of American modernist ballet as an artistic catalyst, filter, and vibrant, shared vocabulary. Through the intertwined languages of ballet, painting, photography, and sculpture, Mauss also mines a pre-queer history within the realm of supposedly straight cultural production of the 1930s and 1940s. The exhibition itself is a hybrid of a historical presentation and an unfolding artistic proposition that forges new modes of attention, viewing, and an engagement with history in the present.

This exhibition is organized by Scott Rothkopf, Deputy Director for Programs and Nancy and Steve Crown Family Chief Curator, and Elisabeth Sussman, Sondra Gilman Curator of Photography, with Greta Hartenstein, senior curatorial assistant, and Allie Tepper, curatorial project assistant.

WHITNEY MUSEUM, NEW YORK
NICK MAUSS: TRANSMISSIONS
MAR 16, 2018–MAY 018

credits_ 

Carl Van Vechten slides 
photographed Nick Mauss 
Courtesy The Carl Van Vechten Trust and
The Jerome Robbins Dance Division,
The New York Public Library for the Performing Arts,
Astor, Lenox and Tilden Foundations.

 

David Hockney MET exhibition 2018


David Hockney MET exhibition 2018


 

 

DAVID HOCKNEY
the metropolitan museum of art, nyc


november 2017
 

For nearly 60 years, David Hockney (British, born 1937) has pursued a singular career with a love for painting and its intrinsic challenges. A major retrospective at The Metropolitan Museum of Art—the show’s only North American venue, opening November 27, 2017—honors the artist in the year of his 80th birthday by presenting his most iconic works and key moments of his career from 1960 to the present.

 
David Hockney 2017 at MET by Akiko Kondoh for LE MILE Magazine
 

Born in West Yorkshire, where he attended the local Bradford School of Art, Hockney moved to London in 1959 to study at the Royal College of Art. His career is distinguished as much by early successes as by his willingness to flaunt conventions both societal and artistic. Hockney’s works from the 1960s brazenly reference homoerotic subject matter, from Walt Whitman to Physique Pictorial muscle magazines, while his dedication to figuration throughout his career runs against the grain of predominant art world trends on both sides of the Atlantic.

Many fine examples of Hockney’s work from California in the late 1960s and early 1970s, as well as his double portraits from New York, London, and Los Angeles, show the artist’s interest in the tension that exists in social relationships and the difficulty of depicting transparent material such as glass and water. By the late 1970s and early 1980s, Hockney turned to a brightly hued palette and fractured, cubistic perspective that mirrors both his interest in Pablo Picasso and his own experiments with Polaroid photography. In recent decades, Hockney has ventured outdoors to paint the changeable landscapes of his native Yorkshire across the seasons, while simultaneously returning to the study of figures in social groupings. Keenly interested in scientific innovations in the aid of art, Hockney recently experimented with an old technology: he created a series of portrait drawings using a camera lucida, first employed by artists in the Renaissance to render one-point perspective.  He has also always embraced new technologies, including the possibilities for colorful composition offered by applications on the iPhone and iPad. Examples of the artist’s experiments in that medium will be included in the galleries. The exhibition ends with his most recent, near neon-toned landscapes, painted in the last three years in Southern California, where he returned to live in 2013. The Met presentation marks the first time the series will be exhibited publicly in the United States. Even to the most committed follower of Hockney’s art, the unprecedented unification of his renowned early works with the newest, will be revelatory.

At The Met, David Hockney is curated by Ian Alteveer, Curator, with assistance from Meredith Brown, Research Associate, both in the Department of Modern and Contemporary Art.

The exhibition is accompanied by a fully illustrated, scholarly catalogue published by Tate.

 

CREDITS:
All Images by Akiko Kondoh, LE MILE Studios

www.metmuseum.org

 

Blondey Mccoy unveils three Burberry murals in Manhattan


Blondey Mccoy unveils three Burberry murals in Manhattan


 

 

BLONDEY McCOY x BURBERRY
Murals in Manhattan


november 2017
 

British artist, designer and pro-skater Blondey McCoy has created three hand-painted murals in the Flatiron and Soho districts of Manhattan, designed exclusively for Burberry.

 
Blondey McCoy unveils three Burberry murals in Manhattan - Soho, Lafayette Street and Spring Street x LE MILE Magazine
 

The murals mark the first time Blondey's work will be showcased in New York and include his largest artwork to date. The three murals are inspired by the dichotomy of modern life and the traditions of the holiday season
and feature Blondey's signature mix of eclectic imagery and striking motifs alongside references to Burberry and British culture. This collaboration marks the evolution of the relationship between Burberry and Blondey, who most recently appeared in a portfolio of images for the brand captured by British photographer Alasdair McLellan. In September 2017, Blondey created an artwork for Burberry on the largest paintable wall in London, situated near the brand's show venue in Clerkenwell.

 

'Blondey is an extraordinary talent and I am blown away by the incredible artworks he has created for us in New York.
The passion, energy and skill that go into everything he does are remarkable and his approach to design, from inception to the techniques he uses to bring them to life, transcends his years...He truly is one in a million, and I am so proud to be collaborating with him on this very special project.'
- Christopher Bailey

 

'Christopher and I have kept in constant contact since our first mural in Clerkenwell, whose short but sweet lifespan only made it more pressing that we work together again. We decided to do three more, centred around the holiday season in New York, which is quite fitting as my favourite Christmas song is "Fairytale of New York". Over the last couple of years I have been collecting antiques and objects, some more sentimental than others, and incorporating these into my works. These new murals are a composition, a curation of some of these objects that sit aside references to Burberry and British culture.'
- Blondey McCoy

CREDITS_
Photographer Michael James Fox
Artist Blondey McCoy 

www.burberry.com

 

A Modern View on Timesless


A Modern View on Timesless


 

 

A MODERN VIEW ON
"Timeless"


august 2017

written JULIA AHTIJAINEN

TIMELESS /ˈtʌɪmləs/ (adj) - not affected by the passage of time or changes in fashion. 

 

Italy is one of the crown jewels of Old Europe, a country that is unique and diverse from both a geographical and cultural point of view. One must live it to understand it right, to understand the way the time has passed the places, the streets, the way the time has shaped the forms, the values and the attitudes, the way the traditions have remained the same and on the other side, the way it all has stood the test of time. 

In today’s online world it’s becoming more and more difficult to recognize the origin of an object, to evaluate the quality and to understand the style. This fact creates a solid ground for the feeling of nostalgia to grow and develop. The word “nostalgia” comes from two Greek roots: νόστος, nóstos (“return home”) and ἄλγος, álgos (“longing”). Professor Svetlana Boym of Harvard University defines it as a longing for a home that no longer exists or has never existed. Nostalgia is a senti- ment of loss and displacement, but it is also a romance with one‘s own fantasy. In her works one can see that the feeling of nostalgia is not only backward-looking, but that nostalgia can be also forward-looking, prognosing. After reading Boym’s works and writing my own Bachelor’s about menswear and nostalgia, I would have never thought that years later, my hypothesis of nostalgia would reappear in my life not only within the texts and images, but also in a real and very original way. So, one day... 

 Caraceni Sartoria Atelier

Caraceni Sartoria Atelier

One day I met by chance a Japanese guy, Kensuke Takehara. Ken has been living in Milan for the past 7 years, and he has worked as a tailor in one of the oldest and most respected tailor houses of Italy – Sartoria A. Caraceni. The guy knows probably more about Italian suit aesthetics and speaks better Italian than an average local. Why? He says that he had a strong vision and a very good teacher – Francesco Severgnini, one of the few gentlemen who still wears and is true to traditional Milanese style. The question is still “why”?
Wearing a proper suit is “forma di rispetto”– a certain form of respect. It is a gesture showing respect towards the occasion, the place and the people, and is most certainly, a bow towards the art of Italian tailoring. Francesco is in a class of his own, always dressed in his own – Severgnini Milano, with perfectly picked color combinations, one can inspect the best of masculine elegance in every detail of his look.

While catching up with Kensuke, he reproves his student for combining modern pieces like Supreme, Converse and Knickerbocker Mfg. Co. with a classic suit by De Petrillo Napoli. “Napoli!? I’m from Napoli! From the same place where this suit originates from!” says our photographer, Davide Annibale. Davide has been travelling the world to capture the nostalgia and the real essence of the streets of Paris, New York, Chicago and Milan. But he has never lost his Neapolitan identity. He says that growing up in Naples was the best school one could ever have and that it made him extremely aware of the people around him in every sense. “Naples is the place where you understand what it means to be smart, ‘italian smart’, and the place where you simply appreciate the history, because it’s still there very strongly,” he explains. That fact can be seen also in his works as his visual stories are ageless. Just as with a classical sartorial piece, either it’s sewn today or 70 years ago – it is timeless. 

 Kensuke Takehara

Kensuke Takehara

 Francesco Severgnini

Francesco Severgnini

Timeless like the creations of Sartoria A. Caraceni tailoring house. “Nothing has changed since we started. All the styles, the fabrics, the linings, the cuts and the stitches – everything is still made by hand by the best tailors of Milan, out of the best Italian and English fabrics,” tells Carlo Andreacchio Caraceni, accompanied
with a warm smile while continuing his work. He adds that though all the styles have remained the same since the very beginning, he himself is not a nostalgic person. He is rather positive and lives in the present moment: “Every day I make jackets, for me this is life, this is what I like to do and this is the present and the most important.” Speaking of importancy, the house of Caraceni has been responsible for the looks of internationally well-known actors, statesmen, counts and other significant personalities who have shaped the culture and the society. Having tons of stories to tell that happened in and outside of the tailoring house, from particular Japanese clients to tailoring a frac for the Nobel Prize winner, Italian poet Eugenio Montale, Mr Caraceni could go on with the stories and we could make an outstanding book of or a movie scenario. When I asked him, whether a gentlemen with an incredible life path like his believes in a chance or in a fact that everything happens for a reason, he says that he believes that everything happens for a reason. “Everything has a motif and I’m very sure of that,” he adds with a mysterious look and for a ‘dolce’ gives a tour in the tailoring house that feels like a squareshaped mini labyrinth. 

M. Carlo Andreacchio and Massimiliano Andreacchio Caraceni are the men behind a family-run tailoring house Sartoria A. Caraceni, that has been handed down over 70 years, since its establishment in 1946. The house that has been famous for cutting techniques and has an expertise of one unique technique in particular that is passed on to only one person per generation. Speaking of uniqueness, Alessandro Squarzi might be one of the few Italians who has the most unique col- lection of vintage menswear, not to mention the fact that his own wardrobe is a size of 500 square meters. Recently named as number one best dressing man in the world by Esquire magazine, vintage pieces and timeless style are his passion for life. “I am out of fashion,” says the man, “and I am very nostalgic, I love old military and leather jackets, I love old denim.” He says that it’s easy to wear a modern piece, but to mix ageless pieces with modern requires a good taste and a character to wear it. Clothing style is simply a self-expression. A significant part of Alessandro’s style and how a gentleman could be recognized is because of his White Pant Credo. “I come from Rimini, a beach city where a pair of white pants is a must. And I like to wear my white pants like denim, I like them to look warn, to show the history of a wearer, to be timeless,” says Alessandro and shows his soon-to-be-opened store in Porta Venezia – Fortela. “Fortela is timeless, has no seasons and all the models are the same,” describes Mr Squarzi. In Fortela he will enliven the traditional style of a shop, where you have a tailor always present upstairs and warm timelessness greeting everyone who will enter the store that feels more like a familiar home rather than a shop. 

 
 Alessandro Squarzi

Alessandro Squarzi

 

Italians say often “la casa mia e la casa tua” meaning my house is your house. That is probably one of the best saying to summarize Italian way of doing things. Once you’re invited, you’re part of the family. And Milan, out of all the fashion capitals, is most certainly one of the most welcoming. This international city still holds its traditions strong, takes care of the styles and heritage, and passes the stories and secrets from one generation to another. From one persona to another. People you meet here all carry and care about the heritage, the knowledge and the experiences shared. Italian mystery could be solved by viewing the traditional menswear and the simple belief that everything happens for a reason. The essence of timelessness has been caught and the proof lies in its history. 

 

CREDIT INFORMATION
CREDIT INFORMATION | © Davide Annibale
www.davideannibale.com