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Croatian Films at DOK Leipzig


Croatian Films at DOK Leipzig


 

 

Political Roots,
Digital Spaces,
Young Folks &
Big Screens

*Croatian Films@DOK Leipzig 2018


october 018

The 61st edition of DOK Leipzig is set to kick off on 29 October. This year’s festival features films that depict transformational processes or aim to spark change, honours Austrian documentary filmma- ker Ruth Beckermann and living legend Werner Herzog, provides exciting insight into Lithuania’s film scene in the Country Focus and showcases the cinematic work of Leipzig artist Lutz Dammbeck. On top of all that, fascinating creations from the realm of animated film get their moment in the spotlight too, as well as further works for the big screen which take a look at the legacy of the Soviet Union, at strong women and perception of women, at architectural masterpieces and deep into the abyss – while getting to the roots of current political trends in Germany, Europe and beyond.

Balkan / Post-Soviet Realities: Many of our films treat crises of identity – including those which depict everyday post- Soviet realities and observe individuals in the Balkan states as they attempt to process the conflict-marred recent history of their homelands.

Film “IKEA Four YU”_
Marija (33) grew up in a family that lives Yugoslav ideals even today. Given that Marija and her family are of Serbian origin, who continued to live in Croatia, regardless of the pressures of the recent war, the Yugoslav identity is the one they felt closest to (more than only the Croatian or Serbian one). She had always felt that her family's ideals were her own, until her life path turned her in a different direction. When she founded her own family with her husband, she began to question her parents' and grandparents' values, as well as her own, and if that was the environment in which she wanted to raise her son (5). Within a journey through the family history, Marija opts for a "new beginning" in a totally different environment and sets up a new home ... in Sweden. This film is a story about growing up, separation from the nest, and accepting one's own value system, and how to get there, in the atmosphere of a stable and loving family.

 © The Cure (2018)

© The Cure (2018)

Film “The Cure”_
Through a series of seemingly simple everyday scenes, the director Ana Opalic depicts the period of several months in the life of her mother Tamara, who suffers from oropharyngeal cancer. The daughter looks to understand why her mother still smokes, despite her condition.

 © On the Water (2018)

© On the Water (2018)

Film “On The Water”_

A portrait of a former industrial city shown from the perspective of the river running through its centre. Today, the river is a space of relaxation and leisure. The film by director Goran Devic allows a closer look at the people spending time along its banks reveals all the social conflicts of a country in transition.

61st International Leipzig (Germany) Festival for Documentary and Animated Film:
DOK LEIPZIG 29 OCTOBER – 4 NOVEMBER 2018

 
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PRADA presents "STORYTELLING", a solo show by Liu Ye at Prada Rong Zhai in Shanghai.


PRADA presents "STORYTELLING", a solo show by Liu Ye at Prada Rong Zhai in Shanghai.


 

 

fondazione PRADA
*Storytelling - Liu Ye


october 018

Prada presents *Storytelling, a solo show by Chinese artist Liu Ye curated by Udo Kittelmann, with the support of Fondazione Prada. The show will take place in the premises of Rong Zhai, a 1918 historical residence in Shanghai restored by Prada and reopened last year. The exhibition project will show the work of Liu Ye through a selection of 30 paintings realized from 1992 onwards.

 © Liu Ye  Chet Baker , 2009 Acrylic on canvas 40 x 30 cm Private Collection, Beijing

© Liu Ye
Chet Baker, 2009
Acrylic on canvas
40 x 30 cm
Private Collection, Beijing

Liu Ye expresses an intimate and sensual imagination, that feeds on heterogeneous sources related to literature, history of art and popular culture from the Western and Eastern hemisphere, giving rise to atmospheres which evoke introspection, purity and suspension. In the artist’s oeuvre the stylistic features of fairy-tales coexist with the sense of humor and a parodic vein.

Referring to his own artistic production, Liu Ye underlined that “every work is my self-portrait”. Combining different elements and sources, his paintings are generated by a plurality of creative forces: memory, observation, imagination and artistic education. All his works are pervaded by a certain ambiguity as they seem suspended between two worlds: reality and invention. During his artistic development he created a personal domain, at the same time accessible and impenetrable to others, which can be described as a subjective reality.

 © Liu Ye  Mondrian in the Morning , 2000  Acrylic on canvas, 180 x 180 cm Private Collection, Beijing  Photo: Cao Yong (曹勇)

© Liu Ye
Mondrian in the Morning, 2000
Acrylic on canvas, 180 x 180 cm
Private Collection, Beijing
Photo: Cao Yong (曹勇)

One of the most distinctive feature of Liu Ye’s initial approach was the collision of anachronisms, typical of an individual immersed in a foreign culture: modern art motives combined with old masters’ quotations, western cultural references associated to Chinese cultural icons. The autobiographical nature of his work assumed another connotation after his return to his homeland from Europe in the late nineties. He employed his art as a mean of self-exploration and discovery, in a context in which artistic creation and daily life mutually influenced each other. As he specified, “Even though I have never become an abstract artist, I am nonetheless interested in stripping down narrative and simplifying.” His visual narratives don’t progress linearly or logically; they are based on contrast as a collage of different forms and languages.

As Udo Kittelmann highlights, “I experienced his paintings as sensitive pictorial messages relayed between two worlds that are often viewed as contradictory: Western cultures versus Asian cultures. Even back then, Liu Ye’s paintings struck me as manifesting a dialectical constellation, for his work is not only interwoven in many ways with China’s manifold cultural developments; it also bears witness to a profound knowledge of the history of European culture and painting. His pictures are grounded equally in traditional Eastern and Western intellectual and artistic trends, conjoining the strengths of the past and the future.”

Within the decorated spaces of Prada Rong Zhai, Liu Ye’s enigmatic works will acquire a new layer of meaning, engaging a dialogue with the architecture and the unique atmosphere of this historic, early 20th century mansion, which was originally conceived as a place of encounter between European and Chinese traditions. The sequence of the rooms of Rong Zhai’s two main floors will punctuate the exhibition, revealing unexpected resonances between Liu Ye’s paintings, and their relation to the architectural and decorative elements. Visitors will be invited to freely move around the different spaces in order to create a palimpsest of images, memories and new stories told by the artist.

 
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C/O Berlin will be presenting the exhibition Nobuyoshi Araki . Impossible Love—Vintage Photographs.


C/O Berlin will be presenting the exhibition Nobuyoshi Araki . Impossible Love—Vintage Photographs.


 

 

NOBUYOSHI ARAKI
*Impossible Love—Vintage Photographs


october 018

A young woman with her legs spread wide; buttoned-up dressed workers on a city street. Photographs like these of intimate, private scenes juxtaposed against snapshots of nameless passers-by were an early commentary on the heterogeneity of Japanese society. In 1973, Japanese photographer Nobuyoshi Araki published a series of image pairs showing life in Tokyo between 1969 and 1973 as a photo- graphic book. In their authenticity, these early works by Araki reveal a dysfunctional society, calling the social responsibility and moral sense of its members into question.

 Kinbaku, 2010, Polaroid  © Nobuyoshi Araki Courtesy artspace AM, Tokyo

Kinbaku, 2010, Polaroid
© Nobuyoshi Araki
Courtesy artspace AM, Tokyo

Nobuyoshi Araki is one of the most influential and widely discussed artists in the world whose work deals with nakedness, sexuality, and the body in a radical and realistic way. In these works, what is most surprising to the viewer is the photographer’s lack of distance and the familiarity of his gaze. Araki’s extreme closeness and intimacy with the subjects and the situations depicted are unique and revolutionary to this day. In contrast to classic photojournalism, which looks into an unfamiliar world from the outside, Araki not only is part of his subjects’ lives but also plays a central role in his own photographs, thus transcending voyeurism. He navigates the tense relationship between classical visual composition and his chosen visual themes with a direct, intense visual language, creating works that are in equal parts moving and unsettling and that set him apart from virtually all of his peers. His work concentrates on a sexuality that is lived out in complete openness. In depicting this, the artist never denounces or accuses, but instead leaves all inter- pretation up to the viewer. Together with US photographers Nan Goldin and Larry Clark and Ukrainian photographer Boris Mikhailow, Araki is considered one of the pioneers of intimate, subjective photography.

 Ohne Titel, a.d.S.  The Days We Were Happy , 1975 © Nobuyoshi Araki Courtesy Privatsammlung Eva Felten

Ohne Titel, a.d.S. The Days We Were Happy, 1975
© Nobuyoshi Araki
Courtesy Privatsammlung Eva Felten

In this unique compilation and for the first time in Europe, C/O Berlin presents the exhibition Nobuyoshi Araki . Impossible Love—Vintage Photographs. Exclusively on view at C/O Berlin, the show combines Araki’s Tokyo series from his early works with a selection of his recent Polaroid collages and newly developed slide shows— all of them exploring the contradictions between anonymity and intimacy, the public and private sphere, reality and dream. A catalog accompanying the exhibition will be published by Steidl Verlag, Göttingen.

 
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Foam presents the first solo exhibition by Paul Mpagi Sepuya in Europe.


Foam presents the first solo exhibition by Paul Mpagi Sepuya in Europe.


 

 

PAUL MPAGI SEPUYA
*Double Enclosure


october 018

In his exhibition Double Enclosure, Sepuya enters into a dialogue with himself as artist, his subjects and the spectator. He comments on the medium of photography as a construction of longing: the longing to record things, to look, to touch and to keep. Through a combination of draped fabric, careful framing and layered images of existing work, the viewer sees arms, thighs, torsos and hands, but rarely the whole body of the subject. In this way, the spectator is visually challenged to tease apart the construction of the image.

 Darkroom Mirror Study 2017  ©Paul Mpagi Sepuya

Darkroom Mirror Study 2017
©Paul Mpagi Sepuya

With this visual strategy in which he references a homo-erotic visual culture, he explores the productive and critical power of longing as an essential part of his work.  

The exhibition shows a free selection of work from series that Sepuya has developed during the past three years. His photographs often contain fragments or compilations from earlier work, which appear in the image as strips or cuttings, overlap the camera lens or are pasted to the mirror of the studio in which he is taking his photos. He firmly distances himself from digital applications by shooting in his studio mirror and bringing his diversity of materials together in a single plane. Thus, his images are not collages in the true sense of the word, but ingenious compositions created in front of the lens and recorded in a single shot. The subjects portrayed, the camera and tripod, and prints of earlier images come together in layered, collage-like compositions that demand an active form of looking. Moreover, by constantly pointing the camera at us as the central motif in the image, Sepuya makes the spectator aware of himself, as the construction of the image not only takes place via the photographer, but is also strongly dependent on the interpretation of the viewer. In this way, Paul Mpagi Sepuya plays a self-assured game of exposure and concealment, an exploration of surface and reflection, lens and mirror, touching and tracing. His provocative approach arouses a feeling of desire, to see that which is hidden.


 Mirror Study for Joe 2017  ©Paul Mpagi Sepuya

Mirror Study for Joe 2017
©Paul Mpagi Sepuya

 
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New York City: Two strangers. One Pill. A haunting body of work.


New York City: Two strangers. One Pill. A haunting body of work.


 

 

A LITTLE BLUE PILL/TWO MEN
*Two Strangers. One Pill. A haunting body of work.


september 018


written MALCOLM THOMAS

There is nothing quite as powerful as the art of collaboration. Unless perhaps, it’s prescription drugs. Meet Roxy. Full name: Roxicodone. The little blue pill that you’ll never take home to mother. The opiate of choice for an adolescent prep school kid in Houston, who once moonlighted as a YouTube influencer and stylist for celebrity rappers. Preston Douglas has since gone on to become a menswear designer, outfitting the likes of Travis Scott and debuting a collection at New York Fashion Week. 

 Torn Apart, 48” x 72”, $1,400

Torn Apart, 48” x 72”, $1,400

  Ten years his senior, Tyler Swanner, a multimedia artist, was going through his own struggle. His diagnosis of advanced glaucoma, a degenerative eye disease that can ultimately lead to blindness, had Swanner thinking about his own habits and vices. Prescribed drugs, rituals, medicines and his partaking in illegal substances all became fair game. The result— a body of unedited work that is both personal and eerily relevant. In 2016, 2.4 million Americans were reported to have an opioid use disorder. A large majority of abusers ranging from 12 to 17 years of age and some even as young as 1 year old, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics.

“Tyler and I met just two months ago, and I knew from the moment we started talking that we would be friends. It was like talking to my future self,” said Douglas. “He just moved back from Los Angeles, and I had just gotten back from staying in New York for a while, so I invited him over to my studio to see what I had been working on. We ended up talking for almost three hours,” he continued. 

Douglas’ A Love Letter to Roxy series, a collection of gestural abstractions, low-life motifs and internet-derived collages seemed to hit the perfect note to Swanner’s series. A drug that had once lead a young Douglas to steal a Lamborghini with his drug dealer and to finding vicarious satisfaction in watching National Geographic’s Hillbilly Heroin documentary in withdrawal. But in his artist statement he emphasizes, “Despite the title, this body of work does not aim to romanticize this part of Preston’s life. Rather it serves as a daily reminder to himself of the pain that comes from loving that little blue pill, and as a mechanism of gratitude for escaping her crushing grip. One day at a time.” 


A Little Pill
artwork available for sale, for inquiries e-mail: info@prestondouglas.us
film Chris McElroy 
music NNOA
© copyright + courtesy Tyler Swanner + Preston Douglas

 
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Taiwanese-born, New York-based artist is known for her custom temporary tattoos of social currency


Taiwanese-born, New York-based artist is known for her custom temporary tattoos of social currency


 

 

JOHN YUYI
*Social Currency | Interview


august 018

No one does social convention quite like John Yuyi. The Taiwanese-born, New York-based artist is known for her custom temporary tattoos of social currency: a ‘like,’ a ‘retweet,’ a ‘match,’ a ‘follow,’ a ‘read’ receipt, the unnerving ellipses that appear just as fast as they disappear, etc. Instead of being confined to a screen, they are displayed on parts of the body for the world to see. 

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  Her rendering of other status symbols, including Gucci’s green-red stripes, the LV monogram, the Nike swish, and two very famous interlocking “C’s,” has introduced us to a new type of logomania. Inspired by her own life, family, friends, strangers, and social media,

Yuyi is proving that sometimes connectedness is only a ‘follow’ away.


written + interview Hannah Rose Prendergast

 

Le Mile: Would you like people to view your work as more of a reflection on youth culture or a commentary?
John Yuyi
: I don't think about that too much. I think when I create my work, I don't anticipate what people will see. I recently kind of found out that my work is like my dairy, so maybe I give people the vibe of youth culture. I don't really mind how they define the works.

 

Le Mile: Do you have an affinity for all these luxury brands, logos, and social media or an aversion?
John Yuyi: I think both because I'm a really contradictory person; I'm positive, but I'm depressed. I'm sensitive, but I'm super chill about somethings people can't be chill about. I love social media, I see the positive and beneficial side of it, but I also feel kidnapped by it. Sometimes I just want to delete every account. So I think all the brands, logos, and social media things for me, of course, I love it, I love those things people love, but at the same time I’m thinking about the contrasting side to this stuff. Sometimes it makes me feel excitement, sometimes it make me feel emptiness. I guess I am always like that. I always feel really bipolar: at either two extremes.



Le mile: As a fashion design graduate, what was it like being commissioned by Gucci for Le Marche Des Merveilles collection last year?
John Yuyi: It's the craziest thing; I never thought it would happen in my life. As a fashion design graduate in Taiwan, I thought the only relationship you could have with Gucci was to buy a product in store or maybe work with one during a magazine editorial shoot. But I never thought that I could work as the individual, John Yuyi, with [Gucci] HQ. The project is global, it's really insane. Some people say I am so easy to buy, I'm capitalism, but I'm fashion design majored, so tell me the reason why I'd say no to this dream project. 


Le Mile: Your resume also includes graphic design, photography, styling, and modelling. Do you ever feel pressure to pick one? Or do you see your work as more of a collective effort?

John Yuyi: I think nowadays, people all require multiple skills or multiple identities. Yes, I feel pressure to pick one because I'm not a professional full time model, I'm not a professional full time stylist, graphic designer, etc. But I got different jobs doing different things, so I used to call myself a freelancer since I didn't know how to introduce myself. When I create my work, I’m doing a lot of different things, so I guess everything is involved a little bit. 


Le mile: Do you think art and fashion can be the same thing?
John Yuyi
: I think art includes a lot of things, and fashion is art. It's definitely art!

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Le Mile: You’ve referenced Hokusai Katsushika in your 2016 works: “Megumu's browser” and “Ukiyo-e.” Is he someone that inspires you?
 John Yuyi: Yes! He is amazing and timeless. I definitely got inspired by his work. One of my favourite dresses has his art on it. But he’s not the only artist that has inspired my life theory.


Le Mile: Do you believe that sex sells and is it something that you agree with? Talk a little bit about your “Skin on Skin” project (2016), was your intention to portray the oversexualization of women?
 John Yuyi: No, I just wanted to play with a fake "skin on skin" cycle. But a lot of people told me that they think it's a reflection of the objectification of a woman’s body. I like that people have an unlimited imagination when it comes to what it means; it's the most interesting part for me. When I was at my solo show opening, one boy came up to me and told me his thoughts on "Julia's Twitter." He told me that her tongue, stuck out with a “Following” tattoo, indicated that she would do anything for a ‘follow.’ I was so surprised! I am so in love with people telling me how they see my work!
 

Le Mile: You’ve mentioned in the past that your work helped you cope with anxiety and depression. Is this something you still struggle with today?
 John Yuyi: Yes, I still do. Sometimes I feel better, but sometimes I feel that I’m getting worse.
I work because I feel anxious, and when I work too much I feel stressed. When I finally can take a rest, I feel guilty for not working hard. It’s kind of become a bad cycle for me.
 


Le Mile: What was it like doing the latest campaign for Nike Air Max with Lauren Tsai?
  John Yuyi: It's a celebration of Nike Air Max. Hypebeast found a few artists to do the artwork. I'm glad I was chosen as one of the artists, but Lauren and I worked on the project individually, so I didn’t get a chance to work directly with her. But she's so pretty and talented all in one. I'd like to work with more talented Asian women in different fields in the future!


Le Mile: How has your work evolved since you started in 2015?
 John Yuyi: I don't know, I just keep feeling like it's all about luck. I keep walking this journey, but unpredictable things keep happening to me. I feel flattered and I feel small at the same time. I need to push myself to move faster than what I've got.


Le Mile: Who did you last follow on Instagram?

I think it's @mylesloftin. I'm not sure, but the latest one that I remember is him! He’s the photographer that shot me during the Gucci Wooster opening in New York.

works_ © + The Artist: John Yuyi
© + Courtesy  Artist

 
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Read the Interview with Artist Phannapast Taychamaythakool
 and her work for GUCCI.


Read the Interview with Artist Phannapast Taychamaythakool
 and her work for GUCCI.


 

 

PHANNAPAST TAYCHAMAYTHAKOOL
*fashion illustrator | Interview*

august 018

Conversing with fashion illustrator and Instagram famed artist Phannapast blossoms into a larger dialogue about the relationship between fashion and art. A portfolio of multiple collaborations with Gucci, a creative studio and an DIY -approachable point of view establishes this mixed media artist as a progressive creative with a soft heart for romanticizing the details of human experience through illustration.

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  Click through her social media posts, @phannapast and discover a fairytale filled with magical creatures; her illustrations, embroidered patches and beadwork dictates storytelling while inspiring a journey into definitions of human expression from art. 

For if art is a creative form of communication, fashion is the art of socially acceptable expression through clothing design and the manipulation of fabrics into a found culturally interested product.

With sensitivity this comparison stimulates a discussion about the purpose of fashion. In our conversation, the greater debate that defines fashion as art passes without obstruction; for fashion is a tool in Phannapast’s work that elevates communication.

 



written + interview Valerie McPhail

 

Le Mile: How would you describe your art? Do you have an artist’s vision?
Phannapast
: My art is another form of communication. It tells stories about my experiences or my view towards my surroundings. Sometimes, when I look back on it, it is like a personal diary. The art tells a lot about what kind of music I was listening to at the time, the book I am reading, or the people I have met. 


Le Mile: What are your thoughts and opinions on the relationship between fashion and art?
Phannapast
: Personally, I believe that art stays everywhere, including fashion. Fashion is the story of the art which appears on the body — in movements, and dimensions. Fashion speaks a lot about the mood, the perspective and the personality of a subject; therefore it is also a personal communication. Designing clothes requires a lot of creativity and imagination. There are different types of knowledge in fashion like fabric design — the choice of colors you use, silhouette design, the structure and the pattern of clothing. Combined with inspiration in the right amount this is when fashion and art meet. 

 

Draping maxi dresses on butterflies, suiting a young buck in a pastel, floral printed Gucci two piece: animals play dress-up in her work for the GucciGramTian. The animal motifs continue to tell the story behind the creation of Gucci jewelry at the Wonder Factory.

With intergalactic cats and an elegant elephant spraying rainbows from her trunk, Phannapast’s  drawings capture the imagination and eccentric personality of the Italian house. 

 

Le mile: I would like to talk about your experience working with Gucci: how did the work and collaboration with Gucci manifest? 
Phannapast
: Alessandro Michele discovered my work on Instagram in 2016. Shortly after I collaborated with Gucci on 3 projects: GucciGramTian, The Fairy tale book for Le Marché des Merveilles Jewelry Collection, and, recently, Bloom Acqua di Fiori perfume. They are very important experiences I am very happy and proud of. 

Le Mile: What is meaning behind the animal motifs in the work?
Phannapast
: I use the animals to represent my feelings. Whether it is a tiger, a bird, a crocodile: they represent a part of myself. Sometimes I draw them with a mole below the lip because I have the same mole. 


Le mile: Can you explain the story of your illustrations in this work?
Phannapast
: In every Gucci project, there is always a story of myself. It is the experiences or how I think at that moment or something that I have been through: self-acceptance and how we can see the value of ourselves and the relationships with people around you. In every picture, there is a personal symbol hidden, the character's act and how it expresses itself. There is also a physical and visual expression. I use both to convey my message through expression.

 

Le Mile: Have you always created work in fashion and fashion illustration?
 Phannapast: I always like to add a little fashion into my drawings. You can see the animal characters wear different clothing, sometimes, the flowery pattern has a little gimmick hidden in it, and sometimes I use the different palette of colors that is more special than the natural tone.

Fashion illustration is just a portion of her work. The artist showcases the larger part of her work in her workshop titled Pommecopine Studios, which shares her whole heart and vision as an artist. Embroidered sparrows nesting on button downs, collectable patches of fawns, cheeky babies and cats pay ode to a home base, her childhood. These expressions are patchwork pieces that will lead Phannapast to making her artistic dreams a reality.


Le Mile: And you have a studio, Pommecopine Studio, which showcases your solo fashion and artwork. What is the heart and soul of this project? Can you explain the meaning behind the name?
Phannapast: Pommecopine is a nickname my friend gave me when I was studying branding at the university. It came from my personal hairstyle, which looks like an apple. Pommecopine first became my brand of clothing for dolls and figures. Now, my intention is to create Pommecopine as a brand that represents what I loved during my childhood. I still like dolls, patchwork, embroidery, or handmade knickknacks. That’s why I also organize workshops for people who are interested. Now, I have a mascot for the brand named Rainbow Sue, which I named after my mother. She represents happy days.
 

Le Mile: The platform extends beyond illustration into embroidery, beading and patchwork, what inspires you to create new forms of art?
Phannapast: Embroidery and patchwork are my hobbies. I’m thinking of combining them to my art. At the moment, I’m interested in creating a soft sculpture from fabrics. 

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Le Mile: Can you elaborate on the type of work we should anticipate next?
 Phannapast: Right now, I want to bring out my world into a form of work that in tactile, something that you can interact and share experience with. It is my dream for the future which I will take time developing.

Through her whimsical works Phannapast tells tales from her life experiences and shares with us her art, collaborations and  passion projects — they share her visions, aspirations and dreams — unveiling the soul of an artist.

 

portraits_ © + The Artist
Artworks (illustrations)_ © + Courtesy Gucci

 
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Eckhaus Latta operates at the intersection of fashion and contemporary art.


Eckhaus Latta operates at the intersection of fashion and contemporary art.


 

 

ECKHAUS LATTA:
*Possessed at Whitney Museum

august 018

Eckhaus Latta: Possessed highlights the work of Eckhaus Latta, a compelling young design team who belongs to a new generation of designers operating at the intersection of fashion and contemporary art.

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  The New York- and Los Angeles-based fashion label was founded in 2011 by Mike Eckhaus (b. 1987) and Zoe Latta (b. 1987), who met as students at the Rhode Island School of Design. They are known for using unexpected materials, emphasizing texture and tactility in their designs, and for incorporating writing, performance, and video into their practice. Through collaborations with artists, musicians, and others, and an approach that plays both with and against industry conventions, Eckhaus Latta addresses the crosscurrents of desire, social relations, and consumption. 

For their first solo museum exhibition, Eckhaus Latta will present a new three-part installation that embraces and brings into conversation various aspects of the fashion industry, from advertising and the consumer experience to voyeurism.

 

The installation begins with a sequence of photographs that play on the tropes of iconic fashion photospreads, exploring how Eckhaus Latta’s unique aesthetic functions in relation to the highly polished look of the industry’s media. The core of Possessed is an operational retail environment in which visitors may touch, try on, and purchase clothing and accessories designed specifically for the show. Elements of the space—such as clothing racks, display shelves, and a dressing room—were created by more than a dozen artists with whom Eckhaus Latta has been in dialogue. The exhibition concludes with a darkened room, evocative of a security office, which features a bank of screens depicting surveillance footage. Visitors will have a voyeuristic view of the rest of the installation, as well as a glimpse into the tracking and surveillance that often accompanies the experience of shopping.

 

Eckhaus Latta: Possessed is organized by Christopher Y. Lew, Nancy and Fred Poses Associate Curator, and Lauri London Freedman, head of product development. On display: Aug 3–Oct 8, 2018 at Whitney Museum, NYC.

exhibition images: Akiko Kondoh, LE MILE Studios

 

https://whitney.org

 

MORE ARCHIEVE art


MORE ARCHIEVE art