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MoMA presents exhibition BEING: New Photography 2018


MoMA presents exhibition BEING: New Photography 2018


 

 

BEING: 
*New Photography 2018*

april 018

MoMA features recent works by 17 artists that address ideas of human experience, self-making, and collective identity.

  Paul Mpagi Sepuya  Mirror Study (4R2A0857). 2016. Pigmented inkjet print, 51 × 34′′ (129.5 × 86.4 cm).  The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Fund for the Twenty-First Century.  © 2017 Paul Mpagi Sepuya

Paul Mpagi Sepuya
Mirror Study (4R2A0857). 2016. Pigmented inkjet print, 51 × 34′′ (129.5 × 86.4 cm). 
The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Fund for the Twenty-First Century. 
© 2017 Paul Mpagi Sepuya

  The works included in Being take on contemporary existence and human experience through a range of issues and tactics, including interrogations of traditional modes of portraiture in the history of photography, the use of surrogates or masks as replacements for the body, tensions between privacy and exposure, and the agency of the artist. Some works might be considered straightforward figurative depictions, while others do not include imagery of the human body at all. Since its earliest manifestations, photography has been widely seen as a means by which to capture an exact likeness of a person, and the artists featured in Being mine or upset this rich history in their considerations of the ramifications of photographic representations of personhood in the contemporary moment. In turning toward the personal, some arts evoke feelings of introspection or intimacy, while others investigate social relations of community, and in so doing foreground the subject of humanity or being in the world. 

  Sam Contis  Denim Dress. 2014. Pigmented inkjet print, 34 × 44 1/2′′ (86.4 × 113 cm). Courtesy the artist and Klaus von Nichtssagend Gallery, New York.  © 2017 Sam Contis

Sam Contis
Denim Dress. 2014. Pigmented inkjet print, 34 × 44 1/2′′ (86.4 × 113 cm).
Courtesy the artist and Klaus von Nichtssagend Gallery, New York. 
© 2017 Sam Contis

    The works respond to diverse lived experiences and circumstances. “While personhood is something that we all share, also inherent in these representations is the recognition of difference, which is especially urgent in our current moment when rights of representation are contested for many individuals,” said Gallun. “Universality in humanity does not mean sameness.” 

Being: New Photography 2018 is constituted primarily of works made since 2016, both by artists who are just starting out in their careers, showing in New York for the first time, and by others with more established practices—and who, in some cases, have been supporting the field of photography through teaching or creating other platforms for production. For all the artists, this will be the first exhibition of their work at the Museum.

 
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Blue Magic: Cuba by Alban E. Smajli


Blue Magic: Cuba by Alban E. Smajli


 

 

ALBAN E. SMAJLI
*Blue Magic: Cuba*


april 018

written Mikal Shkreli

We descended onto the island, with some expectations and preconceptions of what we were about to experience. However, what we didn’t realize was the reality of the stories we heard, existing in the multifaceted, aesthetic stimuli that enlivened our senses, that lead us to the same truth; we are now in Cuba. Like a safe place in the fast-changing world, Cuba exists as an island where manmade time stands still and nature takes over the measurements. 

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 A rather large island, Cuba is a living memory of a world where humans developed towns and villages in accordance with nature; in the pastel colors and in the ease of shapes in the architecture that reflects the wind’s travels as it carries the scent of the ocean. I found our presence to be humble, honest, sincere, and real. As the birds fly overhead and the ocean waves lap onto the shore, the steady hum of diesel fueled cars and distant music echo in harmony together under the ever-present sun, which watches over this land. 

The ground feels more like the real earth, and the energy is steady yet moving, as the hummingbirds flutter nearby, carrying their hurried energy beyond blooming flowers and past car engines. We walk on the ground, with unsettled dirt from the driving cars on the street.

Of course, the scent of smoked meats and grilled onions passes through the air as well, and again, this harmony of human existence, with its rightful melodic accompaniment in the song of nature, is joyfully played, without effort, without stress, but with the natural highs and lows that we all repeat on earth as the sun soars from one end of our vision’s sight towards the next. 

The view might be iconic, as the type of cars with small subtleties in detail such as the round rear view mirrors distract us from the larger picture. However, this is life, and beyond the stillness in time for the women pushing strollers, the men in jackets walking by governmental buildings, and the men selling fruits on the street, Cuba is home. We take a taxi towards the water, speckled with tiny boats that float by the dock without anyone in them, being governed by an old castle of stone that prominently waves the national flag. Walking back towards the larger roads, we pass small streets with houses dressed with balconies, lined with women drying towels, sheets, clothes, as the sweat accentuates their furrowed foreheads and falls down the crevices of their plump faces. 

In the present moment, the feeling of eternity remains in the ever present ‘now’, and somehow in contrast, every passing hour has a complete different feel than the one prior. Almost a miracle, the sun seems to race from the sky and fall into the ocean, bringing with it, adornments that change color, change scent, change their energy that fills up the air we breathe when we continue to explore Havana. The houses too change their appearance, and their solid structures that stood strong in the sun, are now majestically placed to reflect the light of the moon on their colors, which now only seem to be in hues of blue, in this magic hour of dusk. At night, the heat stops rising from the ground, and the scent of the white mariposa, the butterfly jasmine, along with the cool, ocean air, sweeps through the streets that have become even more quiet. The air brings with it scents of stone, of metal, of a history that took a long time to build, and that happened to stand still like tombstones in a forgotten graveyard. We find a tree with oranges and can smell their sweetness from the outer skin. A baby cries nearby and we are reminded, that in this particular world that took time to build, had stopped its growth in reference to most of the world’s change, but what does take the lead, is nature.


 

credits_
Alban E. Smajli
Cuba, 2013
Courtesy the artist

 
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LEXUS Design Award - Grand Prix Winner 2018


LEXUS Design Award - Grand Prix Winner 2018


 

 

LEXUS Design Award
*CO-*


april 018

Lexus International has announced the Grand Prix winner of the Lexus Design Award 2018―Testing Hypotheticals by Extrapolation Factory―leading this prestigious international event to a pinnacle of excitement. Lexus Design Award 2018 drew a record 1319 entries from 68 countries under the theme of "CO-".  

 
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 "This year's winner permeates the current thinking about the role of design in our evolving and technologically shifting societies. Products played less of a role, and design education/teaching and thinking are at the forefront. How citizens and designers interact with products, processes and future is increasingly critical to mediating this influence of design in our increasingly future-orientated and technologically evolving world. The chosen design shows methods and techniques for engaging the public and designers in role playing possible futures and negotiating the influences of our technological world." said David Adjaye, Lexus Design Award 2018 judge and architect.

Elliott P. Montgomery of Extrapolation Factory commented, "It was truly fantastic, and the experience was incredible to have worked with our mentors Formafantasma. We could not have done this without the support of Lexus."

Since 2013, the Lexus Design Award has supported the next generation of designers from around the world. For our sixth year, 2018, the Award's theme is "CO-", a Latin prefix meaning with or together. Lexus believes that great design can ensure the harmonious coexistence of nature and society. In that sense, "CO-" is an approach that allows the brand to explore its true potential and that of the environment by creating new possibilities through collaboration, coordination and connection.

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From among the wealth of "CO-" design submissions, our elite judging committee has selected 12 finalists, four to be prototyped and eight to be shown as display panels. These will be revealed to the international design community at Lexus' "LIMITLESS CO-EXISTENCE" exhibition, held 17-22 April 2018 in the Cavallerizze in Museo Nazionale della Scienza e della Tecnologia Leonardo da Vinci during Milan Design Week, the world's supreme design event.

For this exhibit, Lexus has called upon Japanese architect Sota Ichikawa to be the overall concept space designer. In the main installation, Ichikawa has used innovative methods to represent the ultimate experience of LIMITLESS CO-EXISTENCE. The Lexus LF-1 Limitless concept, earlier introduced at the North American International Auto Show, is also featured using Ichikawa's unique method.

 

www.lexusdesignaward.com

 
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C24 Gallery presents sculptures by Brian Tolle marking his inaugural exhibition with the gallery.


C24 Gallery presents sculptures by Brian Tolle marking his inaugural exhibition with the gallery.


 

 

BRIAN TOLLE
*Bent*


march 018

C24 Gallery is pleased to present a solo exhibition of sculptures by Brian Tolle marking his inaugural exhibition with the gallery. The exhibition brings together Tolle’s iconic public work, Eureka, on view for the first time in the United States and in a gallery setting, paired with his Levittown sculptures.  

 
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 A highlight of the exhibition is the monumental installation Eureka. At approximately 36 feet high, when standing, the sculpture is a 3D rendering of the façade of a 17th-century Flemish canal house as it might exist in wave form. Thus, it becomes an uncanny reflection of the kinetic water below it. Originally commissioned by curator Jan Hoet for his landmark exhibition Over the Edges (2000), as a site-specific public installation in Ghent, Belgium, the sculpture is re-contextualized in the gallery space. Lying flat on the gallery’s atrium floor Eureka confronts notions of place and process thereby questioning the function of art in public spaces versus art in specific institutions. Drawing ideas from a broad-based conceptual analysis, Tolle creates a dialogue between the contemporary and the historical and blurs the border between architecture and its evolving environment.

A keen observer of domestic life and identity, Tolle furthers his interest of politics of place in his Levittown sculptures. The sculptures are inspired by the planned housing community, Levittown: the historic town in Long Island, NY, which became the archetype of American suburban life in the early 1950s. Each of Tolle's eleven sculptures is a precise scaled model of an original Levittown home -- cast from the same mold varying only in color and displaying the architectural details of the original structures. The sculptural houses themselves resemble deflated or melting membranes, and are supported by various appropriated mementos of suburban life - found toys, tire swing, shopping cart, a plastic nativity set, and a recliner. These iconographic items rest underneath and inside silicone rubber skins of the houses, emphasizing a dialogue between sites and domestic artifacts.

As the title of the exhibition suggests, the artworks presented in Bent provoke a re-reading, or discord between reality and fiction. The formal play that Tolle visually articulates between shapes and textures, private and public spaces presents a challenge to standard architectural, as well as behavioral conventions and norms.

 

C24 Gallery, NEW YORK
Bent
BRIAN TOLLE: BENT
January 11–February 24, 018
credits_
C24 Gallery

 
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BETWEEN THE WATERS Exhibition at Whitney Museum 2018


BETWEEN THE WATERS Exhibition at Whitney Museum 2018


 

 

WHITNEY PRESENTS
*Between The Waters*


march 018

This exhibition brings together a group of emerging artists: Carolina Caycedo, Demian DinéYazhi´ with Ginger Dunnill, Torkwase Dyson, Cy Gavin, Lena Henke, and Erin Jane Nelson. Responding to the precarious state of the environment, their work explores the relationship between the land, systems of use or governance of the land, and the forms or ways of life that exist on the land. 

LE MILE Magazine Rez Dog, Rez Dirt at Whitney Museum 2018 Between the Waters

 Experimenting with form and narrative in painting, video, and sculpture, these artists address how ideology and personal belief—as much as technology, industry, and architecture—impacts all living things. Though each contends with facts or histories that are real and observable, none takes a documentary approach. Rather, these artists adopt a highly subjective position, embracing emotion, intuition, spirituality, and myth to help understand our intrinsic place within the “natural” world. They share the sense that scientific, or “rational,” thought can reinforce a limited view of our planet and its inhabitants—one that assumes they can and should be controlled.

The works present a wide range of subjects, from communities affected by hydroelectric-dam construction in South America to those displaced during the controversial transformation of New York in the mid-twentieth century by city official Robert Moses. They draw from distinct visual traditions, including Southern handcraft, sixteenth-century architecture, history painting, and hard-edge abstraction. Through their varied interests and formal approaches, all of these artists assert the relevance of individual experience and perspective to address concerns that are global in scale and effect. In the words of artist Torkwase Dyson, this exhibition is not just about “the way we connect...but understanding also the waters that are between us.”

 


WHITNEY MUSEUM, NEW YORK
from March 018
organized Elisabeth Sherman
 curatorial assistant Margaret Kross

credits_
Demian DinéYazhi
Rez Dog, Rez Dirt, 2013
Video, color, sound; 3:59 min. loop.
Courtesy the artist

 

Exhibition: ACHA, LLAQTA, WASICHAY: BUILDING THE INDIGENOUS PRESENT at Whitney Museum, 2018.


Exhibition: ACHA, LLAQTA, WASICHAY: BUILDING THE INDIGENOUS PRESENT at Whitney Museum, 2018.


 

 

PACHA, LLAQTA, WASICHAY
*Building the Indigenous Present*


march 018

Pacha, Llaqta, Wasichay gives center stage to contemporary art practices that highlight indigenous thinking around the built environment.

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 The three Quechuan words—the indigenous language most spoken in the Americas—pacha (time, space, nature, world), llaqta (place, country, community), and wasichay (to build) each point to a decolonial approach of preserving and foregrounding indigenous concepts that transcend the English term architecture. Rather than upholding Western modernist architecture as a marker of development in the Americas, the artworks in this exhibition explore the conceptual legacies inherited from, and also still alive in, indigenous groups that include the Inca, Quechua, Maya, and Arawak, among others. Artists such as William Cordova, Jorge González, Ronny Quevedo, and Clarissa Tossin investigate the complex relationship that indigenous and vernacular notions of construction, land, space, and cosmology have had in the history of modern and contemporary art and architecture in the Americas. 


WHITNEY MUSEUM, NEW YORK
from July 018
This exhibition is organized by Marcela Guerrero,
assistant curator, with Alana Hernandez, curatorial project assistant.

credits_
Clarissa Tossin, Ch’u Mayaa, 2017, production still 
performer Crystal Sepúlveda
cinematography Jeremy Glaholt
Originally commissioned by the City of Los Angeles Department of Cultural Affairs
for the exhibition Condemned to be Modern 
as part of Getty Foundation’s Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA.
Courtesy the artist

 

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MORE ARCHIEVE art